First Line Friday – 4.21.17

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What are you reading this week? Open the book nearest you and share the first line with me!

Today I’m featuring a book patiently waiting on my To Be Read list:  A Lasting Impression by Tamera Alexander.

A Lasting Impression cover image

FRENCH QUARTER, NEW ORLEANS,
LOUISIANA
SEPTEMBER 1, 1866
Claire Laurent studied the finished canvas on the easel before her, and though masterpiece hardly described it, she knew the painting was her best yet.

This novel has an interesting preface written by the author explaining how there are bits of actual history woven throughout the mostly fictional novel. I am looking forward to reading it as it creeps closer to the top of my TBR list.

Now it’s your turn! Grab the book nearest to you and leave a comment with the first line!

Then head on over and share your first line with these friends:

Carrie @ Reading Is My Super Power

Rachel @ Bookworm Mama

Sydney @ Singing Librarian Books

Andi @ Radiant Light

Heather @ Encouraging Words from the Tea Queen

Sarah @ All the Book Blog Names are Taken

Robin @ Robin’s Nest

Katie @ Fiction Aficionado

Bree @ Bibliophile Reviews

Beth @ Faithfully Bookish

Amanda @ With A Joyful Noise

Lauraine @ Lauraine’s Notes

Jessica @ A Baker’s Perspective

First Line Friday – 4.14.17

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It’s Friday! Yay! I love sharing these first lines with you all and reading the lines you share with me. It’s so fun to discover new books and authors together.

Today I’m sharing the first line from a book by an author I have recently come across and sincerely enjoyed. The author is Nerys Leigh and the book is titled A Hope Unseen. It’s the second book in her Escape to the West series, but can easily be read as a stand alone (the references to her first book/characters in the series will simply pass unnoticed).

A Hope Unseen

 

June, 1869
Sara crept down the staircase, carefully keeping her stockinged feet to the edge where she knew none of the steps would creak.

I know I listed mail order brides as one of the things I was tired of reading back in January of 2016, but as I stated then, there is a reason this premise is so popular. It’s fun, it’s adventuresome, and there is just something romantically thrilling in idea of it. More importantly, Nerys Leigh managed to add a unique element to her plot which I hadn’t read before in a mail order bride story. Not saying it hasn’t been done (I haven’t thoroughly researched to figure that out), just that I haven’t seen it done, so it was new to me and I enjoyed it.

Now it’s your turn! Grab the book nearest to you and leave a comment with the first line!

Then head on over and share your first line with these friends:

Carrie @ Reading Is My Super Power

Rachel @ Bookworm Mama

Sydney @ Singing Librarian Books

Andi @ Radiant Light

Heather @ Encouraging Words from the Tea Queen

Sarah @ All the Book Blog Names are Taken

Robin @ Robin’s Nest

Katie @ Fiction Aficionado

Bree @ Bibliophile Reviews

Beth @ Faithfully Bookish

Amanda @ With A Joyful Noise

Lauraine @ Lauraine’s Notes

Jessica @ A Baker’s Perspective

First Line Friday – 4.7.17

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I recently shared with you my (raving) review of The Scarlet Coat by Angela K. Couch and how eager I was for the next book in the Hearts at War series to come out. Well, guess what? Today is RELEASE DAY for The Patriot and the Loyalist!!! To celebrate, I’m sharing the first line:

the patriot and the loyalist cover image

 

Daniel Reid slowed his horse and sucked air into his lungs as he reined to the road’s grassy edge.

I seriously cannot wait to read this book! Daniel was such a strong character in the first book, I’m sure he’ll make an excellent hero and I’m excited to meet the heroine who steals his heart.

Now it’s your turn! Grab the book nearest to you and leave a comment with the first line!

Then head on over and share your first line with these friends:

Carrie @ Reading Is My Super Power

Rachel @ Bookworm Mama

Sydney @ Singing Librarian Books

Andi @ Radiant Light

Heather @ Encouraging Words from the Tea Queen

Sarah @ All the Book Blog Names are Taken

Robin @ Robin’s Nest

Katie @ Fiction Aficionado

Bree @ Bibliophile Reviews

Beth @ Faithfully Bookish

Amanda @ With A Joyful Noise

Lauraine @ Lauraine’s Notes

Jessica @ A Baker’s Perspective

My Review – Long Time Gone

My Review Long Time Gone

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Long Time Gone is officially book number two in the Cimarron Legacy series by Mary Connealy. However, the story begins with a prequel novella, The Boden Birthright before moving on to the first full-length novel in the series, No Way Up.

Here’s the back cover description for Long Time Gone:

Someone will stop at nothing to claim the Boden homestead!

The Boden clan thought their problems had ended with the death of a dangerous enemy, but have they truly uncovered the real plot to take their New Mexico ranch? Rancher Justin Boden is now in charge. He is normally an unshakable and rugged man, but with his brother, Cole, shot and in mortal danger, even a tough man faces doubts. And it doesn’t help that Angie DuPree, the assistant to the doctor trying to save Cole, is as distracting a woman as Justin ever laid eyes on.

With her and the doc’s timely skills, Cole looks to be on the mend, and Justin and the rest of the Bodens can turn their attention back to the dangers facing them. It’s clear now that everything that’s occurred is part of a much bigger plot that could date back to a decades-old secret. Can they uncover all the pieces before danger closes in on them, or is the threat to the ranch even bigger than any of the Bodens could imagine?

Why This Book:

I love Mary Connealy’s writing! Plain and simple. Any time I start a book by Mary Connealy, I know I’m in for a good read with plenty of adventure, romance, and laughter along the way. That said, I did get a copy of Long Time Gone for free from Bethany House in exchange for an honest review. However, I had already read the first two books in this series (well, 1.5 since the first one is a novella) and had planned to purchase this book anyway. So requesting to review this book was really a no-brainer.

Opening Line:

Skull Gulch, New Mexico Territory
November 1880

“Abandoning his sister to save his brother, Justin Boden felt as gutshot as Cole.”

First Impressions:

This book picks up where the last book, No Way Up, left off. Which makes it tough to review without revealing spoilers. So if you haven’t read No Way Up, you may want to quit reading now and go read it first (you’re going to want to read it, anyway), although I will do my best to reveal as little as possible. That said, my first impression of this book was like stepping into my childhood home again. The characters were familiar and nothing had changed. It was warm and welcoming. Although, I’m glad I’ve never come home to a sibling being shot and on the verge of dying! Needless to say, I had no trouble getting drawn right into this story.

 Characters:

**WARNING!**There just isn’t any way to do this section justice without providing spoilers from No Way Up. So, again, if you haven’t read the first book, stop now and go read it! 🙂

Justin Boden – The most natural rancher of the three Boden children, Justin’s heart and soul is invested in the Cimarron Ranch, yet he recognizes that family trumps all and shows it in the decisions he makes. Surrounded by strong, independent women of the west, he’s frequently torn between protecting them and letting them use their skills to assist in the battle to save their home and family. He struggles to overcome his perceptions of who these women are, versus who they actually are and who they are capable of being.

Angie (Angelique) DuPree – A young widow, new to town, Angie has led a hard life full of verbal abuse and neglect by those who should have been protecting her. Accustomed to deferring to the judgment and instructions of others, like a newborn colt wobbling to stand for the first time, Angie is struggling to stand on her own two feet and discover what it means to truly be strong.

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Cole Boden – The eldest of the Boden siblings, Cole has been shot and spends much of the book recuperating and grumbling about not being able to do more (much like his father). However, he is not a static character. His relationship with his siblings is maturing and his perception of those around him is keen.

Sadie (Boden) Kinkaid- Having married Heath Kinkaid at the end of No Way Up hasn’t changed Sadie one bit. She’s still an independent, restless woman, determined not to sit idly by and let the men do all the dangerous work. She’s got plans of her own.

Heath Kinkaid – On the other hand, marriage to Sadie does seem to have changed Heath just a bit. Or perhaps it’s just a natural result of what happened at the end of No Way Up. Either way, this man knows not to try to stop his wife from lending a hand, no matter the risk. His love and respect for Sadie practically drips off the pages and you just can’t help but sigh over their romance.

Chance Boden – The beginning of Chance’s story, with his meeting and marrying of Veronica is shared in the novella prequel, The Boden Birthright. In Long Time Gone, he spends most of his time lying in bed while recovering from a very serious broken leg which almost took his life in No Way Up. That said, he gets much more “screen time” in this book than he did in the last book and his character is by no means bored. (Can’t say more without sharing spoilers from LTG!)

Veronica Boden – a.k.a. “Ronnie” is Chance’s wife and mother to Cole, Justin, and Sadie. (Technically, she’s Cole’s stepmother, but she raised him since he was little.) She’s a no-nonsense woman with a backbone of iron and the hard-earned skills of a true western woman, yet retains her softer side and is disappointed to learn she has missed her daughter’s wedding.

And I just have to add that the romance between Chance and Veronica is still going strong.

Rosita – The Boden’s loyal housekeeper who’s mother was the Chastain/Boden housekeeper before her, so Rosita grew up on the Cimarron Ranch and is like a second mother to the younger Bodens.

Grandfather Chastain – Having died decades ago, he isn’t really a big character in this book, but he is mentioned several times. So I’ll just say that he is Veronica’s father and his story is primarily told in The Boden Birthright.

John Hightree – The foreman on the Cimarron Ranch and long time friend of the family. He is the only ranch hand never under suspicion.

Alonzo – The Cimarron Ranch ramrod, second in charge only to John Hightree, he has been working on the Cimarron Ranch for years and someone Justin completely trusted in No Way Up, but events at the conclusion of that book cause the Boden’s to question their trust in him throughout Long Time Gone.

Ramone – A character from The Boden Birthright, Ramone made a surprise reappearance at the end of No Way Up, and it was discovered that he was Alonzo’s father as well as Miss Maria’s brother. I won’t say more except that he has been under suspicion/mistrusted since The Boden Birthright and that hasn’t changed in Long Time Gone.

Miss Maria – Ramone’s sister and Alonzo’s aunt, she lives and volunteers at the orphanage where she grew close to Sadie who also volunteered there at the start of No Way Up. However, Maria has a very complicated and tragic history, which means that in this book, as in the last, the Boden’s aren’t certain whether or not to fully trust her.

Sister Margaret – a.k.a. “Aunt Margaret” She is a nun and Angie’s aunt. She runs the orphanage in town and cares deeply for her niece.

Mel (Melanie) Blake – Neighbor and longtime family friend of the Bodens, Mel played a small role in No Way Up. Although she gets a bit more time “on screen” in Long Time Gone, she still isn’t a major character here. Nevertheless, there is enough there that I am hoping she gets her time in the limelight in the next book… Perhaps time shared with Cole? 😉

As with other books I’ve reviewed, there are additional important characters, but naming them here would give away certain surprises.

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Emotional Engagement & Pacing of the Story:

Connealy did an excellent job of pulling me right in and getting the action going, but then letting me take a breath when I needed one. There was a steady rhythm to the pacing of the story that kept me reading without making me tense and tempted to skim ahead. I felt the thrill of anticipation but still enjoyed each step along the way. I never wanted to put the book down and didn’t. I finished this book in one sitting.

On the emotional side of things, I laughed, I cried (or at least choked up), and I cheered. These characters were fun and layered. They were spunky and teachable, tough and vulnerable, wise and foolish. The pacing of the story allowed me to enjoy these layers and care about the characters while still feeling the thrill of the action.

Elements I especially liked/disliked:

My favorite part of this book has to be the women. Man, I love these women! I just want to be their friends. And more importantly, I want them on my side in a fight!

Themes:

The primary theme of Long Time Gone is questioning the definition of strength and courage. What do those things truly look like?

Ending:

While the ending is definitely an ending and not a cliffhanger, Connealy leaves enough clues throughout this book to let you know the trouble isn’t over. I had typed up more here, but I’ve deleted it because I don’t want to risk spoiling the ending for this book. Let’s just say I’m happy. I think if you read it, you’ll be happy. And we can wait eagerly for the next book together.

Additional Thoughts:

In case it isn’t already obvious, Long Time Gone is NOT a book I recommend reading as a stand alone. Although you will certainly enjoy it, there would be far too much nuance missed by someone who hasn’t read the first book, No Way Up. In fact, I highly recommend reading the prequel Novella, The Boden Birthright, first and making your way through the series from there. However, you could probably get away with starting at No Way Up.

Overall Rating:

5 out of 5 stars

Have you read any of Mary Connealy’s books? What do you think of her style of writing?

Long Time Gone Quote Image 1

*** UPDATE:  The complete series is now available here: AMAZON

TWEETABLES:

#BookReview: @MaryConnealy ‘s #LongTimeGone, book 2 in the Cimarron Legacy Series.

Looking for a #GreatRead with plenty of adventure, romance, & laughter along the way?

“He needed to get her away from him … just as soon as he wasn’t carrying her home on his lap.” @MaryConnealy #LongTimeGone 

Psst! Feel free to borrow any of the photos in this post for sharing on social media and remember to tag me @KathleenDenly !

Professional Reader
View Disclosure of Materials HERE.

My Review – A Lady In Disguise +GIVEAWAY!

My Review - A Lady In Disguise

Today’s review comes with a bonus GIVEAWAY! So be sure to read to the bottom and enter to win!

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In this intriguing novel of romance, mystery, and clever disguise set in Victorian England, a young woman investigates the murder of her own father.

After the mysterious death of her father, Miss Gillian Young takes a new job as the principal costume designer at the renowned Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. But while she remembers her father as a kind, well-respected man of the Police Force, clues she uncovers indicate he’d been living a double life: a haunting photograph of a young woman; train stubs for secret trips just before his death; and a receipt for a large sum of money. Are these items evidence of her father’s guilty secrets? His longtime police partner thinks so.

Then Gillian meets the dashing Viscount Thomas Lockwood. Their attraction is instant and inescapable. As their romantic involvement grows, Gillian begins to suspect even Lockwood’s motives. Does Lord Lockwood truly love her? Or is his interest a front for the desire to own her newly inherited property? And what should she make of her friend’s suggestion that Lockwood or men like him were involved in the murder of her father?

Soon Gillian is convinced that her father has left evidence somewhere that can prove his innocence and reveal the guilty party. But someone wants to stop her from discovering it. The closer she comes to uncovering it, the more menacing her opposition grows. With her life on the line, Gillian takes on an ingenious disguise and takes on the role of a lifetime to reveal the true killer—before it’s too late both for her and for those that she loves.

Why This Book:

It is far too easy to allow oneself to become stuck in a reading rut, so I make it a point to read outside of my genre on occasion. Granted, A Lady In Disguise is not too far outside my genre – it is still historical fiction – but it is definitely beyond my usual choice in novels due to its heavy emphasis on the mystery portion of the plot, leaving the romance as a secondary part of the story.

Additionally, Sandra Byrd was not an author I had read in recent years and I had never read one of her historical novels, so when I saw the opportunity to be part of a group who would have the privilege of reading the book prior to its release, I applied and was accepted. I did receive a free copy of this book, but was under no obligation to review it favorably. As always, the review below is entirely my own and an honest opinion of the novel I read.

Opening Line:

“I stood, that bleak day, in the graveyard in the village near Winton Park. The chapel’s stone gargoyles, pitted and blinded by the elements, nonetheless mocked our mortality with their jeering grins.”

First Impressions:

I think I was tired when I started this book, because despite the well-done first line it failed to intrigue me. The other explanation might be that the romantic interest is only briefly (and unconvincingly) hinted at in the first chapter and then not seen or really even mentioned again until chapter seven. So perhaps the romantic in me was feeling a bit impatient. Either way, the first few chapters, though beautifully written and filled with a mystery which engaged my curiosity, failed to engage my emotions.

Additionally, the first few chapters left me a bit frustrated by the lack of clarity regarding Mrs. W’s role in Gillian’s life. However, this was clarified in later chapters.

Characters:

Miss Gillian Young – The heroine. She is a self-confident, brave young woman determined to not only provide for herself, but also for those close to her as well as for those in need. Her sense of reason and caution are strong enough to make her a believable character in this story without making her bolder choices outside the realm of plausibility.

Inspector Young – Miss Gillian’s father is deceased prior to the start of the novel, yet he remains a character through Miss Gillian’s memories; and certainly, the mystery surrounding his actions prior to his death are what drive most of the plot forward.

Mrs. W. – Though no title is given, that I recall, Mrs. W. is clearly a long-time employee of the family. Not quite a servant, but paid nonetheless, Mrs. W. has difficulty accepting Gillian’s transition from child to adult.

Viscount Thomas Lockwood – Neighbor to Miss Young’s newly inherited country estate, he is apparently eager to be of assistance to Miss Young, though his motivations are unclear throughout most of the novel.

Sergeant Roberts – The young policeman who’d been training with Inspector Young prior to his mysterious death, now claims to be investigating his mentor’s actions.

Inspector Collingsworth – A long-time colleague of Inspector Young and friend of the family, he is seemingly the head of the Chelsea Police Division.

Francis Collingsworth – Inspector Collingsworth’s son, he is following in his father’s footsteps as a police officer. He is a childhood friend of Gillian with hopes of becoming more. (As they were most frequently – and appropriately – referred to by their last names, I had trouble keeping Francis separate from his father until I noted that he was a constable while his father was an inspector.)

Mr. Wilhelm – Miss Young’s employer at the Drury Lane Theater in London.

I did not wish to sound tediously repetitious. Otherwise, I could have added to literally every character listed (minus the heroine, of course): “his/her motivations are unclear throughout most of the novel.” For it seems that at one point or another each of the characters, outside of Miss Gillian Young herself, did or said something which might warrant suspicion.

There are additional important characters, but to mention them here would give away certain surprises, so I will end my list here.

A Lady In Disguise - Quote Photo

Emotional Engagement & Pacing of the Story:

As I mentioned, the first few chapters did not engage my emotions, although they did engage my curiosity. However, the book felt a bit like a snowball rolling downhill. The momentum gradually, but continuously built until it was at such a pace I could not make myself put the book down.

Elements I especially liked/disliked:

I enjoyed reading about life from the perspective of a primarily middle-class woman who had connections to nearly every level of the various classes in London 1883. I particularly enjoyed the glimpses into the lives of the pantomimes of the time. As a special bonus, there is an author’s note at the back of the book which shares some of the relative bits of history upon which the book is based, which I found fascinating.

I also enjoyed this references to Little Women sprinkled throughout the book.

Themes:

The primary themes are that no one is perfect, reputations are fragile, relationships are key to survival, and trust must be earned. Yet none of these themes are presented quite so clearly in the novel, which plays with these ideas in a way which causes you consider both sides of every story.

Ending:

Perhaps others saw the answers before I, but I will admit that this mystery kept me guessing until the very end. While the essence of the ending did not surprise me, how the author got us to it, did. Yet when it all concluded, everything made sense and fit together perfectly, as any well-written mystery should. I will also add for my fellow romance lovers, that in the end, I was quite satisfied with the conclusion of the romance portion of this novel.

Overall Rating:

3.75 out of 5 stars

(Although bigger mystery fans may rate it higher, this is a reflection of my own enjoyment of the novel.)

One last note:

While this is Book 3 in the Daughters of Hampshire series, I have not read either of the prior two and did not feel this impacted my enjoyment or understanding of this novel in any way. Therefore, I will say this book is clearly able to be read as a stand alone. The other two books in the series are:

Bride of a Distant IsleMist of Midnight

Have you read any of Sandra’s books? Are you a big mystery fan?

TWEETABLES:

“The momentum continuously built until I could not make myself put the book down.” 

Looking for a great mystery? Check out @KathleenDenly’s review of this historical fiction by @SandraByrd

Psst! Feel free to borrow any of the photos in this post for sharing on social media and remember to tag me @KathleenDenly !

A Lady In Disguise - Giveaway Image

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The short version

  1. Share this post on FB/Twitter & tag me!
  2. Comment with Twitter/FB account & favorite historical fiction novel.
  3. Follow the rules.
  4. Check back on Monday, March 27th to see who wins!

The long version

GIVEAWAY Instructions:

Okay, for those of you who enjoy a strong historical mystery with a little romance to sweeten the deal, here’s your chance to win a FREE copy of this book! I’m giving away my advance copy of A Lady In Disguise to one lucky reader! All you have to do to enter is:

  1. Share this post on either Twitter or Facebook and tag me in it using @KathleenDenly! (I’ve made it SUPER easy with those Tweetables above & the FB share button below.)
  2. THEN leave a comment on this post with the title of your favorite historical fiction novel and the Twitter/Facebook account you used to share this post. For example:  If I entered using my Twitter account, I would comment with, “Hey Kathleen! You write the best book reviews on the planet! My favorite historical fiction novel is ___. I shared this post on Twitter via @KathleenDenly“… or you know, something like that 😉

The Rules:

You MUST complete BOTH steps to enter. Only one entry per person is allowed. If you forget to add your Twitter/FB info in your original comment, just reply to your own comment and both your reply and original comment will count as one combined entry. All entries must be complete by midnight on Sunday, March 26th. Winner will be announced on http://www.KathleenDenly.com and contacted directly within 24 hours via the social media account (Twitter/Facebook) they used to share this post. Winner must email their shipping address to writeKathleenDenly@gmail.com within 48 hours, otherwise an alternate winner will be chosen. Unfortunately, due to the cost of international shipping, I must limit this contest to U.S. Residents ONLY. Void where prohibited.

How it works:

I will assign a number to each person who enters.  I will then enter those numbers into Random.org‘s Random Sequence Generator. Whichever number comes up at the top of the list will be the winner. I will then verify that that person has completed both steps and has not made multiple (rule-breaking) entries. If they have not completed both steps or have made multiple entries, they will be disqualified and the process will be repeated until a valid winner is found.

Remember: Check back March 27th to see who won! Or just subscribe to receive my blog updates by email and have the announcement delivered to your inbox! 

My Review – The Scarlet Coat

My Review - The Scarlet Coat

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Surrounded by the musket fire of the American Revolution, Rachel Garnet prays for her family to be safe. When the British invade the Mohawk Valley and her father and brother don’t return from the battle, she goes in pursuit of them. She finds her brother alive but her father has been killed at the hand of the enemy. Amidst the death, how can she ignore a cry for help? Rachel reluctantly takes in a badly wounded British officer. But how long can her sense of Christian duty repress her hatred for his scarlet coat?

Passages of Scripture and fleeting images of society are all Andrew Wyndham recalls after he awakens to the log walls of his gentle prison. Even his name eludes him. Rachel Garnet insists he is a captain in the British army. He mourns the loss of his memory, but how can he hope to remember war when his “enemy” is capturing his heart?

Andrew’s injuries are severe, his memory slow to return, and the secret of his existence too perilous to ignore. As Rachel nurses him back to health, his hidden scarlet coat threatens to expose the deeds of her merciful heart, and Andrew is forced to face a harrowing decision—Stay hidden and risk losing the woman he loves or turn himself in and risk losing his life.

Why This Book:

Last month I won a copy of this book over at Mary Manners & Friends. (Thank you, Mary & Angela!) There was no obligation to provide a review at all, but I was hooked from the first line and after reading the first chapter, I knew I had to share this book.

Opening Line:

“The last rays of sun faded into twilight, and the wind whispered through the trees, as if warning Rachel to turn back.”

First Impressions:

The entire first chapter of this book was compelling. Who am I kidding? The whole book was compelling! Reading the first chapter, though, I felt like a fish on a line being reeled in. And it just kept going. I did not want to put this book down.

Characters:

Rachel Garnet – This heroine has a quiet strength and realistic internal struggles which make her a pleasure to read about.

Joseph Garnet – Rachel’s brother isn’t just an ancillary character. He has depth and undergoes an emotional journey of his own.

Andrew Wyndham – The soldier spared from a slow, agonizing death by Rachel’s unexpected compassion has an interesting backstory which is revealed in pieces as he recovers. I dare not say more lest I reveal too much.

Daniel Reid – A neighbor and family friend whose loyalty is put to the test.

Fannie Reid – A neighbor and family friend just coming into womanhood and the interests that come with it.

Rodney Cowden – The neighbor most vocal about his hatred of the British.

Each of these characters are well-developed, as revealed by the believable choices they make in the circumstances that face them throughout the book.

The Scarlet Coat - Quote Image

Emotional Engagement & Pacing of the Story:

This story drew me in. I could clearly picture the world of these characters and I cared deeply about the choices they were making. The pacing was not so intense that I wanted to skim paragraphs in an eagerness to reach the next event, but it definitely kept me reading page after page. There were twists in the story which I did not see coming and that is always a great comment to be able to make about a book.

Elements I especially liked/disliked:

This book felt like a journey back in time. Instead of viewing the Revolutionary War from the distant, almost omniscient and impersonal perspective we were taught in school, this story takes us into the home and personal lives of just one family. We get a sense of what it might have been like to live through that time of war and be called upon at any moment to take up arms and fight. To know what it was like to kiss your loved ones goodbye, never knowing if they would return home alive or be carted home as a corpse in a wagon.

Themes:

The primary themes are compassion, forgiveness, loyalty, and the ethics of war from a biblical perspective.

Ending:

Just when you think it’s all over, there’s a twist. Rachel and Andrew are certainly sent through the wringer, but the ending the author creates is all the better for it. The Scarlet Coat provides a thoroughly satisfying conclusion, but I must admit I am eagerly anticipating the release of the second book in this series:

the patriot and the loyalist cover image

 The Patriot and The Loyalist, coming April 7, 2017.

(not an affiliate link)

Overall Rating:

5 out of 5 stars

Have you read any of Angela’s books? What do you think?

TWEETABLES:

“Just when you think it’s all over, there’s a twist.” Click to Tweet!

“Reading the first chapter, I felt like a fish on a line being reeled in. And it just kept going.” Click to Tweet!

Psst! Feel free to borrow any of the photos in this post for sharing on social media and remember to tag me @KathleenDenly !